The Congregation of Mary, Queen is the first community of Lovers of the Holy Cross founded by French missionary Bishop Lambert de la Motte in 1670 at Kien Lao at Bui Chu.

Its missionary spirit and spirituality was centered on the Crucified Christ, Son of God and Son of the Virgin Mary. The sisters remained faithful to their consecrated calling despite nearly 300 years of religious persecution throughout Vietnam.

Bishop Peter Mary Chi Ngoc Pham established the sisters as a canonical religious institute according to a Vatican decree on September 14, 1953. In 1954, the Sisters migrated to the South, along with thousands of other Northeners choosing to not live under Communist rule.

Under the wishes of Bishop Pham, the Congregation of Mary Co-Redemptrix sent Father Bernard Hoan Khai Bui to the sisters as a chaplain in this same year of 1954.

With Bishop Pham's agreement and the new Constitution that Father Bui prepared, the congregation's name was changed to the Missionary Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of the World. This was canonically approved and sent by the Vatican through the Diocese of Saigon on May 31, 1966.

This constitution added two new spiritualities: the Evangelical Spiritual Childhood and the Perfect Devotion to Mary according to the St. Louis Grignion de Montfort.

According to the newest Constitution approved by the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life in 1999, alongside Bishop Lambert de la Motte as Founder, Father Bui is recognized and loved as Co-Founder by the Sisters.

Presently, the motherhouse is in Vietnam with over 500 members. Rome also established a region in Springfield, Missouri in 1986. This region has their own formation and novitiate program, with the sisters serving in the respective dioceses.
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